Stay connected:

Blogs

More than naturalistic motifs: recognition of Chinese pun rebus pictures

Many museums and auction houses are often unaware of the pun rebuses hidden in traditional Chinese pictures and have treated them as mere naturalistic ones. Thus, the cultural and social significance contained in the motifs are unfortunately overlooked. Here is an example of a pun rebus design with four different fishes, which conventionally expresses the idea of ‘May you remain pure, clean, and incorruptible’, but was not recognised by most art institutes.

Continue Reading Continue Reading

Why does peach symbolise longevity and immortality in traditional Chinese culture?

In Chinese culture and pictorial art, the peach fruit is often used to wish for long life on birthday parties. How does this fruit become associated with the idea of longevity? Here is Dr Yibin Ni explaining to us the origin of legendary stories related to the peach through his research work over literatures and treasurable artworks.

Continue Reading Continue Reading

A bear or a monkey? Understanding the meaning of pictorial art in the light of Chinese pun rebus culture

When you mistake a motif in a traditional Chinese picture, you could have misinterpreted the meaning of the whole image intended by the ancient craftsman. Dr Yibin Ni has used the following example to illustrate the hidden meaning of a series of images in the context of Chinese pun rebus culture.

Continue Reading Continue Reading

Appreciation of Chinese visual art: depiction of Laozi, the personification of Dao (Tao) on a buffalo’s back

Have you ever wondered why images of an old scholarly man riding a buffalo are often depicted on Chinese antiques? What is so special about this man who looks highly respected and followed by yet still sitting on a buffalo’s back? We hereby invite art historian Dr Yibin Ni to solve the mystery…

Continue Reading Continue Reading

Is this man really dancing with carp: a revelation of a traditional Chinese story on filial piety

Have you wondered why you often see an image of a man lying or ‘dancing’ beside a large fish on Chinese antiques? Is it referring to some figure and story in ancient China? Here is Dr Yibin Ni explaining to us the meaning of this touching story that reveals the traditional Chinese virtue of filial piety.

Continue Reading Continue Reading

Understanding stories on Chinese porcelain: More than just an official and his attendants

Have you ever been puzzled by the description of ‘figural paintings’ for Chinese porcelains listed by various museums and auction catalogues? In fact, many Chinese paintings with figures refer to ancient stories and have meanings behind the scenes. Here is an unusual story about an official and his pet crane.

Continue Reading Continue Reading

We use cookies to improve your experience and deliver personalised advertising. By continuing to use Tutuhaoyi.com, you agree to our use of cookies as detailed in our Privacy & Cookie Policy.